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Medical marijuana laws for every marijuana state are constantly changing. The laws surrounding marijuana can be confusing, and understanding the regulations in each state is ever-changing.

Making Sense of Medical Marijuana Laws

Much of the confusion about cannabis' legal status by state comes from the fact that the federal government continues to consider marijuana illegal.

The government has recently made clear though that it will no longer use federal resources to enforce marijuana laws except for drug trafficking.

Many states had already taken it upon themselves to enact marijuana laws. Further complicating the confusion is that marijuana laws continue to change at the state level making it challenging to follow just where cannabis for medical use is approved.

Currently, 37 states and 4 U.S. territories have enacted marijuana laws. However, not all medical marijuana laws are the same.

Below is a quick reference guide to the 37 medical marijuana states and 4 U.S. territories that have legalized medical marijuana at the current time. This list only relates to medical, and not recreational marijuana.

Medical Marijuana States

Alabama

On May 17, 2021, Governor Kay Ivey signed a medical cannabis bill into law, making Alabama the 36th state to legalize medical cannabis use. However, the medical cannabis law in Alabama places a lot of restrictions on patients.

Under the law, patients can possess up to 70 daily doses of cannabis. Doses are capped at a maximum of 50 mg for the first 90 days. Edible and smokable cannabis are prohibited. No home cultivation is allowed.

Alaska

Alaska passed medical marijuana legislation in 1998 as one of the earlier states to do so. The laws were passed by ballot measure with 58% in favor. Alaska set their possession limit at one oz. of usable marijuana and six plants (three mature and three immature).

Alaska also has the distinction of being the third US state to pass legislation regarding recreational marijuana.

Arizona

Arizona joined the medical marijuana movement in 2010, passed through Proposition 203 with a tight 50.13% in favor. Possession limits were set at 2.5 oz. of usable marijuana over a 2-week period and grow up to 12 plants if a patient's home is more than 25 miles from a dispensary.

Arkansas

The Arkansas Medical Marijuana Amendment was passed by voters with a 53% majority in 2016. However, the first dispensary didn’t open until 2019. Arkansas’s medical cannabis law allows patients to possess up to 2.5 ounces of cannabis every 2 weeks. Patients under 21 years of age cannot consume smokable products. No home cultivation is allowed.

California

California was the first state to legalize medical marijuana, doing so in 1996 through Proposition 215. The measure was passed by 56% and set possession limits at eight oz. of usable cannabis (or more if medically necessary) and allowed patients to grow six mature or 12 immature plants.

Colorado

Colorado rang in the new millennium with the passing of their laws through a ballot amendment. The measure passed with 54% in favor setting a possession limit of two oz. of cannabis flower or 8 grams of concentrate and six plants (three mature and three immature).

Medical patients can grow up to 24 plants if they are registered with the MED and provide the required notice to the local jurisdictions. Patients between 18 and 21 years of age are restricted to 2 grams of concentrate per day.

Connecticut

In Connecticut, medical marijuana was legalized by a house bill in 2012. The limit was set for a one-month supply, which is 2.5 ounces. Medical patients can grow up to 6 cannabis plants (3 mature and 3 immature) indoors.

District of Columbia (DC)

An amendment act in 2010 paved the way for medical marijuana in our nation's capital. Its limit was set at two oz. of dried marijuana, with an 8-ounce limit per 30-day period. Patients can grow up to 3 mature and 3 immature plants (12-plant limit per household).

Delaware

In 2010, Delaware set a possession limit of six oz. of usable marijuana per month following the passing of a Senate bill in 2011. Patients under 18 may possess only cannabis oil of at least 15% CBD and no more than 7% THC. No home cultivation is allowed.

Florida

Florida’s voters passed Amendment 2 in 2016 with a 71.3% majority vote, allowing patients to access medical cannabis.

Patients cannot possess more than a 70-day supply of cannabis at any given time. They may not purchase more than a 35-day supply of smokable cannabis (2.5 ounces or possess more than 4 ounces of smokable cannabis at any one time. Home cultivation is prohibited.

Georgia

Governor Nathan Deal signed Haleigh’s Hope Act in 2015, allowing the possession of 5% THC oil for several qualifying medical conditions. In April 2019, House Bill 324 allowed medical cannabis cultivation in the state and the sale of low-THC oil.

Patients can possess up to 20 fluid ounces of low-THC (<5% THC) cannabis oil at one time. NO home cultivation for patients is allowed. In 2021, SB 195 passed, allowing tinctures, lotions, capsules, and transdermal patches to be sold.

Guam

In 2014, Guam residents passed the Joaquin (KC) Concepcion II Compassionate Use Act with a 56% majority.

Under the law, patients can possess up to 2.5 ounces of dried cannabis or its THC equivalency bought from a dispensary every 14 calendar days. A higher possession amount may be allowed with a doctor’s recommendation. Medical cannabis patients can grow up to 6 mature and 12 immature plants with a cultivation permit.

Hawaii

Hawaii was also a Y2K state, approving a Senate bill regarding the use of medical marijuana. Limits are set at 4 oz. of cannabis, 3.5 grams of concentrate, and 10 plants for home cultivation.

Illinois

The “Prairie State” also approved a Senate bill that allowed for possession of 2.5 oz. of medical marijuana within a period of 14 days. Patients can grow up to 5 plants per household.

Iowa

In 2014, CBD oil was legalized by SB 2360 for children with intractable epilepsy. In 2017, the governor signed into law and expanded the Medical Cannabidiol Act, allowing more qualifying conditions.

In 2020, Governor Kim Reynolds approved House File 2589, adding qualifying conditions and allowing patients to possess up to 4.5 grams every 90 days or more with a doctor’s recommendation. Home cultivation is not allowed.

Louisiana

In 2015, HB 149 set up a framework for medical cannabis use in the state. In 2019, medical cannabis sales began. Patients can possess up to a 30-day supply of cannabis. Smokable cannabis was allowed in January 2022. Home cultivation is prohibited.

Maine

Maine, through a ballot question, legalized medical marijuana in 1999 by a margin of 61%. Patients can possess up to 2.5 usable oz. in a 15-day period and grow up to six plants and 12 immature plants.

Maryland

The state of Maryland allows a 30 day supply with the amount determined by a physician. Recreational cannabis use is legal, so adults over 21 years of age can grow up to 2 plants at home.

Massachusetts

In Massachusetts, medical marijuana had been legal since 2012 when a ballot question passed with a 63% approval rate. The law calls for a 60 day supply of marijuana (up to 10 ounces of flower and 1.5 ounces of concentrate) for personal use only.

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Patients can grow up to 6 plants if the patents gets a hardship cultivation registration.

Michigan

Michigan passed Proposal 1 with 63% in favor in 2008. Limits are set at 2.5 oz. of usable cannabis and cultivation of up to 12 plants.

Minnesota
In 2014, a Senate bill was passed allowing for a 30 day supply of non-smokable marijuana. In 2022, smokable cannabis and infused edible gummies and Chers became legal. Home cultivation is not allowed.

Mississippi

Governor Tate Reeves signed the Mississippi Medical Cannabis Act into law in February 2022. Under the law, patients can buy up to 6 medical cannabis equivalency units (MCEUs) in a week or 24 MCEUs in a month. One MCEU is equal to 3.5 grams of flower, up to 100 mg of infused product, and up to one gram of concentrate. Home cultivation is prohibited.

Missouri

In 2018, Missouri voters passed Amendment 2, legalizing medical cannabis use. Patients can purchase up to 6 ounces every 30 days or more with a certification from a nurse practitioner or physician. Patients may possess up to 6 flowering plants, 6 nonflowering plants, and 6 clones. No more than 12 plants may be grown in a single space, except for caregivers.

Montana

Medical marijuana has been legal in Montana since 2004 when Initiative 140 was approved with 62% favoring the changes. Limits allow one oz. of usable marijuana, eight grams of concentrate, 800 grams of edibles, or 8 milliliters of vape liquid. Patients can grow up to four mature plants and possess 12 seedlings.

Nevada

A ballot question passed with 65% approval in 2000 in Nevada. Medical patients can possess up to 2.5 ounces of cannabis in a 14-day period and grow cannabis at home if access to dispensaries is limited.

New Hampshire

New Hampshire approved their marijuana laws in 2013 following a House bill. Users can possess 2 oz. of usable cannabis during a ten day period. No home cultivation is allowed.

New Jersey

In 2010, New Jersey became the 14th state to legalize medical cannabis. Patients can possess up to 3 ounces of cannabis per month. Home cultivation is not allowed.

New Mexico

New Mexico approved a Senate bill in 2007 regarding medical marijuana use. Patients can possess up to 8 ounces of cannabis over a 90-day period and grow up to 16 plants at home, but only 4 can be mature at once.

New York

A New York Assembly Bill was approved in 2007. Possession limits are defined as a 60 day supply of non-smokable marijuana. . Patients can grow up to 3 immature and 3 mature plants.

North Dakota

North Dakota voters approved medical cannabis in 2016. The law allows patients to possess up to 3 ounces of cannabis flower or 4,000 milligrams of cannabis products. No home cultivation is allowed.

Northern Mariana Islands

In September 2018, the Northern Mariana Islands legalized medical and recreational cannabis. Medical patients do not have a specified possession limit, but recreational users can possess up to 1 ounce of flower, 16 ounces of cannabis products in solid form, 72 ounces of cannabis in liquid form, 5 grams of concentrates, and 6 immature plants.

Medical cannabis patients can grow more than the adult-use limits with a doctor’s recommendation. They may grow up to 12 mature and 12 immature plants per household.

Ohio

In 2016, Governor John Kasich signed HB 523 into law, legalizing medical cannabis. Patients can possess up to a 90-day supply, divided into two 45-day fill periods of non-smokable cannabis products. Home cultivation is not allowed.

Oklahoma

Oklahoma voters legalized medical cannabis in 2018. Patients can possess up to 1 ounce of concentrate and 72 ounces of edible products. They can also possess up to 3 ounces of flower on their person and up to 8 ounces of flower at their home. Patients can grow up to 6 mature plants and 6 seedlings.

Oregon

Oregon was another early proponent of medical marijuana legislation, passing a ballot measure with 55% in favor in 1998.

Patients can possess up to 24 ounces of usable cannabis, 16 ounces of cannabis in solid form, 72 fluid ounces of cannabis in liquid form, 16 ounces of concentrates, 5 grams of extract, 50 seeds, and 4 immature plants.

Pennsylvania

Governor Wolf signed SB 3 into law in 2016, legalizing medical cannabis. Patients can possess up to a 30-day supply of non-smokable cannabis. No home cultivation is allowed.

Puerto Rico

Medical cannabis was legalized in Puerto Rico in 2017. Patients can possess up to a 30-day supply of non-smokable cannabis products (1 ounce of flower or 8 grams of concentrate or edibles). Home cultivation is not allowed.

Rhode Island

A Senate bill in 2006 was approved, paving the way for legalized medical marijuana in Rhode Island. Possession limits include 2.5 oz. of usable marijuana and 12 plants and 12 seedlings.

South Dakota

In 2020, South Dakota voters passed a medical cannabis ballot initiative. Patients can possess up to 3 ounces of flower and grow up to 4 plants (2 mature and 2 immature) at home.

Texas

Texas passed the Compassionate Use Act in 2015, legalizing low-THC cannabis products for patients with intractable epilepsy and was expanded to include more conditions in 2019 and 2021.

Patients can possess cannabis products with THC content below 1%. Flower possession and home cultivation are not allowed.

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U.S. Virgin Islands

The U.S. Virgin Islands legalized medical cannabis in 2019. Patients can possess up to 4 ounces of cannabis, while visitors can possess only 3 ounces of cannabis. Patients can grow up to 12 plants at home.

Utah

In 2018, Utah voters approved Proposition 2, legalizing medical cannabis use. Patients can possess up to 4 ounces or 20 grams of total composite THC in all other medicinal dosage forms. No home cultivation is allowed.

Vermont

Vermont legalized medical marijuana in 2004 via Senate bill. Their limits are held at 2 oz. of usable marijuana and nine plants (two mature and seven immature).

Virginia

In 2017, Virginia enacted a medical cannabis law providing access to CBD and THC oil to patients with intractable epilepsy. The law was expanded in 2018. Patients can possess up to a 90-day supply of cannabis and grow up to 4 plants.

Washington

Washington was also one of the early drivers passing legislation in 1998 through Initiative 692. Possession limits in “the Evergreen State” are set at 24 oz. of usable marijuana and 15 plants, making it one of the more friendly medical marijuana states.

As legislation continues and the country continues to trend toward legalization, it is likely that more states will be added to this list. This relatively recent shift in policy makes right now an exceptional time to learn the medical marijuana trade and start a rewarding and profitable cannabis career.

West Virginia

The West Virginia Medical Cannabis Act (SB 386) was signed into law on April 19, 2017, by Governor Jim Justice. Under the state’s medical cannabis law, qualified and registered patients can possess up to a 30-day supply of non-smokable cannabis products. Home cultivation is prohibited.

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